Posts Tagged Microsoft Word

Is your document readable?

When you prepare a document using Microsoft Word, you’re actually doing two things: writing content formatting the content Word offers many tools people can use to automate the formatting of their Word documents, thus saving them lots of time. But Word cannot help people who have not

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Troubleshooting tables in Word

Sometimes you use the quick “text and tab” method to create tables, only to have Microsoft Word tell you that your proposed table has more or less columns than you meant to create. Time to roll up your sleeves and do a little troubleshooting.

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Out with unused styles!

Chances are you’ll copy text from other places and paste them into your Word document. When you do, you’ll bring along not just the text, but the style(s) from that source document. This isn’t a big deal, but it can on occasion cause minor formatting headaches which

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Inserting table rows

Adding rows to a Microsoft Word table is pretty easy to do, but this keyboard-based method might be the easiest of them all.

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Make long Word tables understandable

When a Microsoft Word table is so long it runs over two pages, it can cause consternation for readers in at least two ways: The header rows – those rows at the top of tables that serve to label the contents of each column – don’t repeat

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Before you send a document…

Most people run spelling and grammar checks on their documents before sending them to clients, collaborators and other people. If you use more sophisticated tools in Word (like cross-references, tables of contents and page numbers, generally known as fields), you also need to: make sure the fields

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What page was that on again?

If you create a long business document, chances are you need to use the same concepts in more than one place. So to prevent redundancy, you create a cross reference that says something like “as discussed in topic X on page Y.” If you type this, then

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Get your numbers right

The usefulness of things like tables of contents, cross-references, index entries and so forth relies on whether they lead to the right pages. You can automate the creation of these document elements, but it’s a good idea to refresh (or update) them before you share documents.

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Troubleshooting by TOC

Sometimes a table of contents (TOC) indicates problems elsewhere in a document. For instance, a heading style might be applied to body text and that text appears in the TOC. Check out this example:

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